Association between allergic rhinitis and poor sleep parameters in U.S. adults

07/19/2018

This study investigates the relationship between AR and sleep parameters in a representative sample of U.S. adults, which was cowritten by Dr. Josef Shargorodsky.

Background

Sandra Y. Lin MD
Evidence suggests relationships between allergic rhinitis (AR) and poor sleep parameters, but population‐based studies in the United States are lacking.

Methods
Cross‐sectional study of 5563 participants ≥18 years old from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who participated in the allergy and sleep questionnaires. The predictor variable was AR (self‐reported hay fever and/or nasal symptoms in the past 12 months). The outcome variables were individual sleep parameters (sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep disorders, sleep habits, sleep medication use, daytime dysfunction). Covariates included age, gender, race, and obesity.

Results
The population‐weighted prevalence of AR was 36.5%. Adjusting for covariates, subjects with AR had higher odds of sleep latency ≥30 minutes (OR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.51; p = 0.04), sleep apnea (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.82; p < 0.01), insomnia (OR 1.85; 95% CI, 1.04 to 3.32; p = 0.04), trouble falling asleep (OR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.75; p < 0.01), waking up during the night (OR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.99; p = 0.01), waking up too early in the morning (OR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.79; p < 0.01), feeling unrested during the day (OR 1.76, 95% CI, 1.43 to 2.16; p < 0.01), feeling overly sleeping during the day (OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.25 to 1.90; p < 0.01), not getting enough sleep (OR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.41 to 1.99; p < 0.01), using sleep medication (OR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.33; p < 0.01), difficulty concentrating (OR 1.93; 95% CI, 1.30 to 2.88; p < 0.01), remembering (OR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.97; p < 0.01), managing finances (OR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.56; p = 0.02), working (OR 2.16; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.22; p < 0.01), and getting things done (OR 2.35; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.06; p < 0.01) due to daytime sleepiness.

 
Conclusion
This analysis of a representative sample of U.S. adults revealed associations between AR and poor sleep parameters including prolonged sleep latency, insomnia, sleep apnea, sleep disturbances, sleep medication use, and daytime dysfunction. These findings reinforce the need to assess sleep quality in patients undergoing evaluation for AR.